Prevention is the Key to Reducing Potential for Achilles Tendinitis

Millions of athletes and non-athletic individuals wake up every day with the pain of Achilles tendinitis. They tolerate the pain, not realizing what it is or the damage they’re doing to their body. It’s one of the top three most common injuries and a chronic condition that becomes particularly difficult to address the longer it’s left untreated.

The Achilles tendon connects the heel bone to the lower leg and calf muscles. Injuries are especially common in runners and those of middle age who are physically active. Preventative and at-home self-care is an essential part of healing and without treatment an Achilles injury can result in tears in the tendon that will require surgical intervention.

Pain from Achilles tendinitis Adelaide begins as a mild pain or ache in the back of the leg or the heel caused by inflammation. It’s more pronounced upon rising in the morning and after running, sports and activities that require frequent stops, starts, changes of direction, and heavy impact on the feet. A sudden sharp pain in the Achilles tendon may indicate a more serious injury that requires immediate attention.

Achilles tendinitis is an overuse injury and the result of intense or repeated strain on the tendon. The Achilles tendon is used each time an individual walks, runs, jogs, jumps, or pushes with their toes. Those who participate in sports or do so only on weekends are at increased risk, along with dancers.

The condition is more common in men and individuals are more likely to develop it as they age. People that are overweight, with high blood pressure, have a minimal arch in their foot, or don’t utilize the proper footwear for their chosen activities are at increased risk. Some medications can increase the potential for developing the condition, along with improper gait, a sudden acceleration in athletic training, and poor training choices.

Prevention is the key to minimizing the risk of developing Achilles tendinitis. Footwear that provides appropriate support and stretching is essential before engaging in physical activity or exercise. Just as important is the type of activity. Alternating high-impact and low-impact activities can be effective for reducing the potential for an injury.

Achilles tendinitis responds very well to early treatment but can lead to damage that requires surgery if it’s not addressed promptly. Nothing will completely eliminate the potential for developing Achilles tendinitis, but preventative measures are available that gradually builds strength and endurance to prepare the tendon for future demands.